margarita

TEQUILA'S TOP CONTENDER With a cocktail as tasty and popular as the Margarita, you can't blame people for wanting to claim some credit. Closely related to the Sidecar cocktail, it's impossible to say with certainty whether this combination of tequila, lime juice and triple sec was first created for Margarita Henkel, the daughter of a German ambassador, in 1941; served in salt-rimmed glasses by Dallas socialite Margaret "Margarita" Sames in Acapulco in 1948; or mixed 10 years prior by Carlos "Danny" Herrera at his restaurant Rancho la Gloria south of Tijuana. No matter the tale, two things are certain: The Margarita is the most popular cocktail in America, and it's best enjoyed with 100% agave Highland tequila.

THE MARGARITA TODAY

Serve blended with or over ice. Garnish with a lime wedge.

FRESH TAKES

Try these simple ways to take this classic cocktail in new directions.
  1. In place of triple sec, use organic agave nectar for natural sweetness.
  2. Create a flavorful rimmed glass dipped in a mix of coarse salt and chile powder.
  3. Add fresh or frozen fruits like pineapple or peach, or spices such as tamarind to the blender.
  4. A garnish of cucumber or fresh herbs will complement the herbaceous agave notes of Cazadores® Tequila.

HISTORY OF THE MARGARITA

1239 The Nahuatl Aztec tribe crafts a fermented beverage called pulque from agave nectar. Among the Indians of Mexico's central highlands, this precursor to tequila was consumed only by priests and their sacrificial victims.

1922 Don José María, a small agave farmer, experiments with different ways of cooking, fermenting and distilling his agave to create the original Cazadores®, delivering a unique taste of the Mexican Highlands.

1936 Iowa newspaper editor James Graham is traveling in Mexico when his taxi driver directs him to a bar serving the Tequila Daisy, a rendition of the Brandy Daisy. Made with tequila, lemon juice, sugar and Curaçao liqueur, it closely resembled the modern Margarita.

1937 England's The Café Royal Cocktail Bookby W.J. Tarling includes an array of 15 concoctions with the unusual Mexican spirit tequila, among them the Picador, combining 1/2 part tequila, 1/4 part lemon or lime juice and 1/4 part Cointreau.

1953 An Esquire article titled "She's from Mexico, and her name is the Margarita cocktail" offers Americans their first printed recipe for the Margarita, naming the combination of tequila and lime juice with a dash of triple sec December's cocktail of the month.

1971 On May 11, Dallas restaurateur Mariano Martinez forever alters the future of the Margarita by modifying a soft-serveice cream machine to easily and consistently mix frozen-style Margaritas. The original machine now resides in the Smithsonian.

1977 Jimmy Buffett's "Margaritaville" from the album Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes reaches No. 8 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, securing the Margarita's position as the classic cocktail of beach life and leisure.

2002 Bacardi acquires Cazadores® blue agave tequila, putting the 100% Highland tequila on a trajectory to become the top premium tequila in the world today, both mixed in Margaritas or savored solo by connoisseurs.