bloody mary

AN ORIGINAL SAVORY COCKTAIL With its peculiar foundation of tomato juice and vodka, the Bloody Mary is in a class of its own-and a most unlikely success story. A pioneer among savory drinks, part of the Bloody Mary's appeal is the way in which it welcomes creativity. Start with premium tomato juice and Grey Goose®-The World's Best Tasting Vodka-then it's up to you! Fancy a dollop of wasabi? Go right ahead! Craving a skewer of grilled shrimp? Drop it in! This is the beauty of the Bloody Mary-part cocktail, part antidote, part meal. With pure vodka and tomato juice as the only prerequisites, the Bloody Mary is a rarity in the realm of cocktails, a classic that anyone can call their own.

THE BLOODY MARY TODAY

Rub the juicy side of a lime wedge on the outer edge of a tall glass then roll the glass lip in the celery salt. Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice, and shake vigorously. Strain into the prepared rocks glass, and garnish with a long stalk of celery or wedge of lime.

FRESH TAKES

Try these simple ways to take this classic cocktail in new directions.
  1. Replace half of the tomato juice with beef bouillon or beef broth and served in a salt-rimmed glass for a Bloody Bull.
  2. Replace 1 part tomato juice with 1 part clam juice, or use Mott's Clamato in place of tomato, for a Bloody Caesar.
  3. Substitute original Grey Goose® with Grey Goose® le Citron for a lemony lift.
  4. Create a flavorful salted rim by combining coarse salt with cayenne, smoked paprika or crumbled, crispy bacon.

HISTORY OF THE BLOODY MARY

1553 Mary I begins her five-year reign as Queen of England. Her mission of returning England to Roman Catholicism includes the execution of hundreds of Protestant leaders, earning her the nickname Queen "Bloody" Mary.

1917 The French Lick Springs Hotel in Indiana runs out of orange juice during breakfast service. Quick-thinking chef Louis Perrin combines fresh-squeezed tomatoes, sugar and his special sauce into a tomato juice "cocktail," destined to sweep across America.

1927 According to his own account, it was this year, while vacationing in Palm Beach, Florida, that actor George Jessel first combined "vodkee" with tomato juice, lemon and Worcestershire sauce for a group of friends. In print ads of the 1950s he boasts "I, George Jessel, invented the Bloody Mary."

1934 Fernand Petiot assumes the role of head bartender at the King Cole Bar in The St. Regis New York. Here, he offers a drink of tomato juice and gin with cayenne pepper and Worcestershire sauce. Because the owners balk at the name Bloody Mary, it goes by Red Snapper.

1938 The Pump Room, a celeb-studded restaurant where movie stars congregate in the exclusive Booth No. 1, opens in Chicago's Ambassador East Hotel. It is reputed that a guest of The Pump Room, unable to find a swizzle stick, is the first to stir the Bloody Mary with a celery stick.

1952 David Embury's new edition of The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks is the first bar guide to propose Tabasco as an ingredient in the Bloody Mary, while praising the drink as "a classic example of combining in one potion both the poison and the antidote."

1960 Weary of ersatz renditions of the Bloody Mary, Herb and June Taylor create a consistent Bloody Mary mix and market it as Mr & Mrs T Bloody Mary Mix. After appearing on American Airlines, the ready-mixed Bloody Mary takes off around the world in the hands of '60s jetsetters.

1995 The Bloody Mary's greatest calling, brunch, turns 100 years old, having been coined by Guy Beringer writing for the British publication Hunter's Weekly in 1895. Beringer proposed the new meal be served around noon on Sundays to accommodate "Saturday-night carousers."